Six on Saturday: July Butterflies

Peacock butterfly on Lysimachia Clethroides

There is so much movement in the garden on these very warm sunny days.  It is just lovely to see the butterflies flitting from flower to flower and amongst the long grass.

Photographing them is more of a challenge but here are six that I have managed to capture in the last few days.


One:  Comma (Polygonia c-album) (Family: Nymphalidae)

Comma butterfly on grape vine
Comma butterfly on grape vine

This second picture shows the very characteristic white comma on the underside of the wing that gives it is common name.

Comma butterfly on grape vine showing distinctive 'comma' on underwing
Comma butterfly on grape vine showing distinctive ‘comma’ on underwing

Two:  Large white (Pieris brassicae) (Family: Pieridae)

Large White butterfly on Verbena bonariensis
Large White butterfly on Verbena bonariensis

Three:  Peacock  (Inachis io) (Family: Nymphalidae)

Peacock butterfly on Lysimachia Clethroides
Peacock butterfly on Lysimachia Clethroides

Four: Small White (Pieris rapae) (or possibly Wood White) (Family: Pieridae)

This white butterfly is very much smaller than the Large White and seems to rarely land to have its photograph taken.  I am not entirely sure which species this is so happy to be corrected.

Small White (or possibly wood white) on buddleja
Small White (or possibly wood white) on buddleja

Five:  Meadow Brown (Maniola jurtina) (Family: Nymphalidae)

Meadow Brown butterfly on Lysimachia clethroides
Meadow Brown butterfly on Lysimachia clethroides

Six:  Gatekeeper (Pyronia tithonus)  (Family: Nymphalidae)

Gatekeeper butterfly on Lysimachia Clethroides
Gatekeeper butterfly on Lysimachia Clethroides

In addition there have been others over the last week or so that I have not yet been able to photograph.  These include the yellow Brimstone, Small Tortoiseshell and Speckled Wood


The Six on Saturday meme is hosted by The Propagator. Click on the link to see what other plant lovers are chatting about.


Honey Pot Flowers are wedding and celebration florists based in Warwickshire in the United Kingdom specialising in natural, locally grown seasonal flowers. We grow many of our own flowers allowing us to offer something very different and uniquely personal.

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10 thoughts on “Six on Saturday: July Butterflies”

  1. I have mixed feelings about cabbage white butterflies, quite happy to see them in the wild or in other peoples gardens. No compunction whatever about killing their babies though. What sort of monster am I?

    Liked by 2 people

  2. I love butterflies, as you say photographing them is not easy but you have done very well. I don’t think I have seen a Gatekeeper, or maybe I have and just not recognised it, it does look a lot like the Meadow brown. Love your Lysimachia clethroides too – does that grow very big? I am debating whether to buy one. I do like the way the flowers spray out. So far I have only seen Red Admirals, Large and Small Whites and a Ringlet in my garden. Where are the Painted Ladies, the Tortoiseshells and the Peacocks?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Our Lysimachia clethroides grows to about 3 feet high and spreads with under ground runners to form a wide clump over time. The runners remain close to the surface and are very easy to clear if you want to keep it in check. Every few years or so we dig it up and replant in other areas of the garden to keep it fresh. Ideally it likes a moist soil and like the phlox are the first to wilt when the soil dries out. It bounces back very quickly after a water. We too are very short of tortoiseshells and peacocks this year. The long cold wet winter may have taken its toll unfortunately.

      Liked by 1 person

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