Planning colour combinations for next year – Six on Saturday

It is the time of year when you begin to sit down with the catalogues and start to plan how you want the garden to look next year.  Very soon we will be clearing this year’s fading annuals ready for planting out new bulbs and biennials.

It is often difficult to remember what exactly worked and what didn’t and so I have started to look back at the year’s photographs to see what struck me as note worthy at the time.

It is really very satisfying to do this and here are six combinations that seem to have worked particularly well in 2018.


One:  Philadelphus and Clematis ‘Niobe’

Taken on 9 June 2018 this picture shows the striking combination of the purple Clematis variety ‘Niobe’ clambering through the fragrant white Philadelphus.

P1010574


Two:  Meadow style

This charming open meadow style planting was at its prime on 2 June 2018.  It combines the delicate pink oriental poppies with mixed coloured Valerian (Centranthus), cottage garden blue/purple aquilegia and ox-eye daisies (Leucanthemum vulgare).

P1010453


Three:  Foxgloves in the rose garden

I would like to think this was planned but the combination of these tall (over 7 feet) Elsey Kelsey foxgloves with the rambling rose ‘Constance Spry’ was striking .  The picture was taken on 16 June 2018.    Next year’s Elsey Kelsey foxgloves were sown in June and will be ready to plant out in mid-September.  I will certainly be placing these charming white and purple foxgloves here again next year.

P1010640


Four:  Nigella, alliums and foxgloves

Again taken in early June this relaxed planting of Nigella damascena, interspersed with Allium cristophii backed by foxgloves worked well.  We tend to let the Nigella self seed each year and then thin them out in the spring to create this dramatic effect.  It has real movement as the breeze travels through the garden.

P1010543


Five:  Hemerocallis and Clematis ‘H.F. Young’

This butter yellow Hemerocallis is one of our favourites.  It is a slightly smaller plant than some of the other Hemerocallis varieties we have.  The combination with this almost pure blue Clematis ‘H.F. Young’ works very well at the back of the small garden behind the house.

P1010462


Six:  Pond edge

The final selection here is a picture from the pond edge border.  Yet more foxgloves (we like foxgloves!) sit wonderfully well with a large planting of sweet william (Dianthus barbatus), feverfew and the contrasting dark foliage of Persicaria ‘red dragon’.  Just visible is the fresh green foliage of the cosmos which grows through to take over as the summer continues.  The photograph was taken on 16 June 2018.

P1010626


The Six on Saturday meme is hosted by The Propagator. Click on the link to see what other plant lovers are chatting about.

Advertisements

9 thoughts on “Planning colour combinations for next year – Six on Saturday”

  1. What stunning combinations!
    I’m about to plant white foxgloves with my pink roses after inspiration from Mottisfont where I visited in June. OMG that place has such an amazing walled garden.
    I love the nigella combination. I started with loads of nigella but then nasturtiums took over! I will have to try this again. Absolutely stunning 6. Thank you for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes Nigella certainly don’t like root disturbance. With the larger N.hispanica we have had some success in growing in small modules then planting out but you do need to let them grow large enough to ensure the root ball does not fall apart as you are planting out.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.