Beyond the autumn equinox

As we move beyond the autumn equinox the hours of darkness now exceed the day light hours.  However, there still seems to be plenty of sunshine on offer and it has been very pleasant this week outside in the fresh air.  We still haven’t had our first frost of the winter and there is a remarkable amount of colour around the garden.

Here are my six for this weekend.


One:  Saxifraga fortunei

Earlier in the year we wrote about the patio at the back of the house to demonstrate the wide range of foliage and textures that make this area such an attractive shady location.  The fleshy leaves of Saxifraga fortunei with their dark green top surface and reddish bronze under surface look good all year.  However, it is only in September and October that they start to flower producing a haze of tiny white flowers which shine out as the evenings close in.

P1020192

This week we were fortunate to be able to attend the RHS lecture by Bob Brown of Cotswold Garden Flowers at Pershore College.  As always at these events there is a nice selection of things to spend your money on and we could not resist this pink flowered Saxifraga fortunei ‘Sibyll Trelawney JP’.  It sits beautifully along side the white ones and I am sure will give us a lot of pleasure for years to come.

P1020190


Two:  Nerine

A couple of years ago we bought a number of Nerine bulbs which we originally grew on in pots to look after them and then planted out into a hot sunny, well drained border at the front of the house.  Although they have produced leaves each year they seem to have taken a very long time to settle in.  This year for the first time they have flowered but are not yet the spectacular display I have been hoping for.  Perhaps they are now beginning to take off!

P1020195


Three: Rudbeckia

Every year without fail the annual and perennial Rudbeckia perform for us.  This year is no exception and they will carry on flowering until the first frosts.  Because they are such successful garden plants they perhaps do not get celebrated as much as they should and so here they are.  This variety is ‘Autumn Forest’.

P1020180


Four:  Rosemary

One of our more unlikely flowering plants for this week is the prostrate Rosemary.  Although growing to less than 12 inches in height it is currently in full bloom amongst the gravel herb borders at the side of the house.

P1020198


Five:  Schizostylis (Kaffir Lily)

Performing at their best at this time of year are the various Schizostylis clumps that we have around the garden.  Ranging from delicate pink to full on scarlet they provide a welcome shot of new colour at this time of year.

P1020193

A new purchase of the variety ‘Princess Pink’ (below) has survived its first year and is showing real promise.

P1020176


Six:  Michaelmas daisies

Last but not least this week are the Michaelmas daisies.  Ranging from tall 5 feet plants to small neat clumps these plants really do bring the garden to life at this time of year (and the butterflies love them).

P1020203

P1020204

More information at Michaelmas daisies in the autumn sunshine


 

The Six on Saturday meme is hosted by The Propagator. Click on the link to see what other plant lovers are chatting about.

Advertisements

10 thoughts on “Beyond the autumn equinox”

  1. I’ve planted Nerines too, but in four years they’ve done nothing but be eaten by snails when I’m not looking! You’re right about Rudbeckia. I wonder how they differ from Gaillardia?

    Liked by 1 person

  2. What beautiful flowers the Schizostylis! I don’t have in my garden but your photos made me want to plant some of these bulbs for the autumn flowering next year. Also nice to see and smell the rosemary in bloom : sit nearby and be in contemplation of time passing, like the statue (with a coat anyway …)

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I saw a similar Saxifrage in a nursery a week ago and nearly bought it. Wish I had now. My “ordinary” Nerines have been solidly reliable for years so I bought some bulbs of ‘Ostara’ and ‘Stephanie’ which are proving much more of a challenge. Do you support your Schizostylis, all of my are flat on the ground.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.